Sharks – Killer Stats

Despite their reputation, sharks aren’t just cold blooded man-eaters. Need proof? Here is some shark attack information:

1820-2012 Statistics of Shark Attacks on Divers Worldwide:

Australia31.46%
North America24.41%
Pacific Ocean Islands14.08%
Central America and Caribbean Islands5.63%
Africa10.33%
Asia6.57%
Europe5.16%
South America1.88%
Open Ocean0.47%

81% of the above recorded attacks were non-fatal. This result illustrates just how often Sharks mistake divers for their natural prey. It’s safe to say Sharks are more likely to follow through with eating their natural prey. Considering these ‘man eaters’ are operating on instinct, it’s a logical conclusion that attacks on humans aren’t followed through due to the opportunistic nature of Sharks (and the fact that we fumble around in the water like shark bait).

Which species of sharks are most known for eating people? The Great White, Tiger and Bull sharks are responsible for over half of the reported attacks (there are over 500 shark species).

NatGeo put together a list of interesting shark facts if you still are not convinced

  • Surfers accounted for 50.8% of all attacks in 2010.
  • Swimmers and waders accounted for 38% of all attacks in 2010.
  • Snorkelers and divers accounted for 8% of all attacks in 2010.
  • Inflatable rafts and inner tubes accounted for 3% of all attacks in 2010.
  • Over the last half-century, there have been more unprovoked shark attacks in Florida (27 out of a total 139) between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. than at any other time of day.
  • New Smyrna Beach in Florida is the shark attack capital of the world according to International Shark Attack File. It is estimated that anyone who has swam there has been within 10 feet of a shark.
  • September is the month with the most shark attacks in Florida.
  • You have a 1 in 63 chance of dying from the flu and a 1 in 11 million chance of being killed by a shark during your lifetime.
  • Over 17,000 people die from falls each year. That’s a 1 in 218 chance over your lifetime, compared to a 1 in 11 million chance of being killed by a shark.
  • The U.S. averages just 19 shark attacks each year and one shark attack fatality every two years. Meanwhile, in the coastal states alone, lightning strikes and kills more than 37 people each year.
  • Only five people die from shark attacks yearly, while millions of people die from starvation.
  • For every human killed by a shark, humans kill approximately two million sharks.
  • Most shark attacks occur less than 100 feet from the shore, mainly around popular beaches in North America (especially Florida and Hawaii), Australia, and South Africa.

Click Here For 15 of Our Favorite Shark Pics