The World’s Most Expensive Scotches

The World's Most Expensive Scotches | Boss Royal

We have compiled a list of the World’s most expensive scotches.

Lessons in excess take on many forms. When people have the money to invest in certain things, they place exceptionally high values on the ones they personally value most. Some of those things make more sense than others, but it is difficult to devalue the pursuit of some of the world’s best scotches. They are not simply a labor of love; they represent something enduring that only improves with age. They also represent a commitment to excellence that the modern world, in many ways, fails to recognize or implement anymore.

It is worth noting, as one peruses this list, that the prices listed for each variety represents the base value, not necessarily the price paid to own it. These scotches often sell at auction at considerably higher than their assessed values.

Glenfiddich, 1937

Price: $20,000

For more than 120 years, Glenfiddich has is one of a precious few single-malt distilleries that remains entirely family-owned. Its whiskeys are among the world’s most awarded single malts, which only serves to prove the innovation, passion and integrity that has endured through the generations. Over time, Glenfiddich has offered whisky lovers and enthusiasts unique varieties, flavors, and limited edition bottles. The 1937 bottle that made it into our survey recently sold for $71,700 at Christie’s International’s wines and spirits sale in London.

The Dalmore 62 Single Highland Malt Scotch, 1943

Price: $58,000

Dalmore distillery began producing quality scotches in 1839. It was founded by Alexander Matheson, who leased the distillery to the Sunderland family. They ran it for approximately thirty years. In 1869, Alexander, Andrew and Charles Mackenzie took over the lease. They doubled the number of still (for a total of four) in 1874. Alexander Matheson’s death allowed the Mackenzie brothers to purchase the distillery in 1891.

In 1917 the Royal Navy took over the warehouses using them as factories to produce mines. This halted production for Dalmore for the duration. Even worse, after the Navy left in 1920, it was discovered that part of the distillery was damaged by fire resulting from an explosion in the warehouses. Dalmore finally resumed production in 1922.

The Dalmore 62 that makes our list was produced in 1943. Only 12 bottles of this particular variety were ever made.

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Macallan Fine and Rare, 1926

Price: $75,000

Macallan is among the best-known high-quality single malt scotches in the world, so it isn’t surprising that the product would come with such a high price tag. The oldest and rarest of Macallan’s Fine and Rare Collection (with 10,000 bottles produced total) was originally assessed a value of $38,000, but a South Korean businessman was so determined to own it, the price skyrocketed to $75,000 at auction.

Anyone who wants to know what $75,000 Scotch tastes like need only visit the Old Homestead Steakhouse in Atlantic city. For a mere $3,300, a shot of the rarest of the rare is available for the asking.

Dalmore 64 Trinitas, 1868, 1878, 1926 and 1939

Price: $160,000

The Dalmore 64 Trinitas proves that alcohol gets better with age. The world’s most expensive Scotch recently sold for $160,000 at an auction in Scotland to UK purchaser Mahesh Patel. This whisky is 64 years old and is a true luxury in the world of fine Scotches. To put it into perspective, if sold by the glass, the Dalmore 64 Trinitas would cost $32,000.

Macallan 64

Price: $460,000

The Macallan 64 is, by an impressive margin, the most expensive Scotch in the entire world. It sold for a staggering $460,000 at Sotheby’s, New York in November of 2010, making it a record-breaking sale for a bottle of whisky. This is one record that is unlikely to be broken anytime soon. Its special decanter is the creation of famous French designer Lalique. It houses 1.5 liters of The Macallan whisky.